Instructors

A list of current, former and upcoming instructors giving classes, workshops, or lectures for Type@Cooper.


Jared Ash, lecturer

Jared Ash is Special Collections Librarian at the Thomas J. Watson Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, where his primary responsibilities are developing and cataloging Watson’s collections of Russian, Slavic, and rare materials.
From 2006 to 2012, Jared was Curator and Librarian of Special Collections at the Newark Public Library (Newark, NJ), where he curated a number of exhibitions drawn from Newark’s rich collections of artists’ books, illustrated books, fine prints, photographs, and fine printing.
As Curator of the Judith Rothschild Foundation from 1997 to 2002, Jared developed and cataloged a collection of more than 1,200 Russian avant-garde books, periodicals, and works on paper that was donated to the Museum of Modern Art in 2001; he collaborated with MoMA’s Department of Prints and Illustrated Books on the 2002 exhibition, The Russian Avant-Garde Book 1910-1934, and contributed an essay, chapter introductions and more to the accompanying catalog. In addition to the MoMA catalog, Jared also has contributed essays on the Russian avant-garde and book design to publications for the Art Institute of Chicago and the library of the Van Abbemuseum, The Education of a Typographer (edited by Steven Heller), and the journals, Central Booking and Art Documentation.
Jared holds degrees in Russian Studies from Brown University and New York University, and a Master’s in Library and Information Science from Rutgers University.


Ken Barber, instructor, lecturer

Ken Barber is a letterer, type designer and type director at design studio and type foundry House Industries. He is also a partner of Photo-Lettering, Inc., the online lettering-vending service nominated by the Design Museum London as a 2011 Design of the Year recipient. Ken's work is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institution’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum and has been honored by the New York Type Directors Club. Association Typographique Internationale recently selected several of his typefaces for inclusion in the organization’s decennial design competition. In addition to teaching at Maryland Institute College of Art, Ken regularly lectures internationally on the subjects of lettering and typography. He also manages typeandlettering.com, an online resource for students and attendees of his frequent workshops.


Luca Barcellona, lecturer

Luca Barcellona hails from Milan, Italy, where he works as a freelance graphic designer and calligrapher in his own studio. He began his career in lettering as an audacious graffiti artist which ultimately led him to the study of classic calligraphy, typography and letterpress printing. In recent years he has been propelled into the forefront of internationally renowned calligraphic artists, conducting workshops and seminars around the world. His works are in the collections of the Harrison in the San Francisco Public Library, the Akademie der Kunst in Berlin, and he teamed up for the reproduction of an old globe from 1500, commissioned from the National Museum of Zurich. Luca has designed logos and advertising campaigns for many leading companies as Nike, Wall Street Institute, Carhartt, Redbull, Lavazza, and a plethora of his highly instructive videos can be found on YouTube. His stunning book “Take Your Pleasure Seriously” is an inspiring collection of lettering art in myriad forms, and is available from John Neal Bookseller


Paul Barnes, lecturer

Paul Barnes is a British graphic designer, specializing in the fields of typography & type design. With Christian Schwartz he is a partner in Commercial Type, an internationally renowned typefoundry with offices in London & New York. Graduating from the Typography course at the University of Reading in 1992, he worked in the early 1990s at the studio of Roger Black and later he became the art director of Spin magazine. Since 1995 he has worked independently and in colloboration on a wide range of design projects. With Peter Saville, he has designed logos for clients such as Kate Moss and Givenchy, and created the “Original Modern” concept for the City of Manchester. In 2010 they created the ‘Modern England’ flags for the England football team with sportswear manufacturer Umbro. He has been a design and typographic consultant to many publishers including The Guardian and The Observer Newspapers, GQ, Wallpaper*, Harper’s Bazaar and frieze . As typographic consultant to The Guardian he was involved in the iconic redesign in 2006, and with Christian Schwartz created the new series of typefaces. For this as part of The Guardian redesign team they received the prestigious Black pencil from the D&AD, as well as being nominated for the Design Museum’s Designer of the
Year.

He has designed several retail typefaces, such as the acclaimed Dala Floda and Marian and also corporate typefaces for the National Trust in England and typefaces for magazines as diverse as Condé Nast Portfolio (with Christian Schwartz), O , the Oprah magazine and Vanity Fair. In newspapers he has designed new typefaces for The Daily Telegraph in London and Finland’s leading quality newspaper Helsingin Sanomat. He has also created the letters used by Puma football teams in the 2010 World Cup. In 2009 Schwartz and Barnes set up Commercial Type, an independent type foundry retailing both their own designs, designs by their staff, and other designers. In September 2006, with Schwartz he was named one of the 40 most influential designers under 40 in Wallpaper*. A year later The Guardian named him as one of the 50 best designers in Britain.


Ed Benguiat, lecturer

Ed Benguiat (pron. “ben’-gat”;) is an American typographic designer.
Ed Benguiat has hand drawn over 600 new typefaces with out the use of any computers including ITC’s Caslon, Avant Garde Cond, Barcelona, Bauhaus, Korrina, Modern, Souvenir, Tiffany, Bookman, Panache, Edwardian Script, and the self-titled typefaces Benguiat and Benguiat Gothic.

Ed became a partner with Herb Lubalin, in the development of U&lc, lTC's award-winning magazine, and eventually became vice president of the International Typeface Corporation.

He’s designed the logotypes for The New York Times, Esquire, McCall’s, Reader’s Digest, Photography, Look, Sports Illustrated, The Star Ledger, The San Diego Tribune, Ford Motors, AT&T, A&E, Coke, and Estee Lauder... the original logos and posters for films: Planet of the Apes, Super Fly and countless others. You name it, he’s done it.
Benguiat teaches typographic design at the School of Visual Arts in his native New York City.

On November 2, 2000, he was inducted into the Art Directors Club Hall of Fame.


Frederik Berlaen, instructor

Frederik Berlaen is a typedesigner with a love for programming and scripting. After studying graphical design at Sint-lucas in Ghent, where he got the passion for pure black & white type, he went to study typedesign at the Royal Academy of Art (KABK) in The Hague. He successfully got a Master Degree at the postgraduate course Type & Media in 2006. He is the author of many industry-standard type design applications, like RoboFont and UFOStretch. Frederik Berlaen works under the name of TypeMyType providing font services, programming and teaching at Luca School of Arts Ghent and at ESAD in Amiens.


David Berlow, lecturer

David Berlow entered the type industry in 1978 as a letter designer for the respected Mergenthaler, Linotype, Stempel, and Haas typefoundries. He joined the newly formed digital type supplier, Bitstream, Inc. in 1982. After Berlow left Bitstream in 1989, he founded The Font Bureau, Inc. with Roger Black. Font Bureau has developed more than 300 new and revised type designs for The Chicago Tribune, The Wall Street Journal, Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Hewlett Packard and others, with OEM work for Apple Computer Inc. and Microsoft Corporation. The Font Bureau Retail Library consists mostly of original designs and now includes over 500 typefaces. Berlow is a member of the New York Type Directors Club and the Association Typographique International, and remains active in typeface design.


Roger Black, lecturer

This year Roger Black is starting a new magazine about type, Typographics. He helped organize the conference by the same name, which has been held the last two years at Cooper Union, New York.

Since LA in 1972, Roger has been chief art director or design consultant for publications all over the world. Among them: Rolling Stone, New York, The New York Times, Newsweek, Esquire, Reader’s Digest, The Los Angeles Times, MSNBC.com, Bloomberg.com, The Washington Post, Semana (Colombia), Panorama (Italy), The Straits Times (Singapore), Kompas (Indonesia), The Nation (Bangkok) Tages Anzeiger (Switzerland), Placar (Brazil), Svenska Dagbladet (Sweden), Scientific American.

He’s been involved in many startups. Some, like Outside, Fast Company and Out, are continuing success stories.

He’s a director at Type Network, a new firm that exclusively offers the typefaces of leading digital type foundries, including Font Bureau, which Roger co-founded in 1989.

Roger continues to spend time in Asia, and at homes in Pass-a-Grille, Florida, and Marathon, Texas.


Thierry Blancpain, lecturer

Thierry Blancpain is a freelance designer and art director living in New York City. Together with Noël Leu he co-founded Swiss foundry Grilli Type in 2009. He received his BA in Visual Communication from the Bern University of the Arts, Switzerland, and has been teaching at his alma mater’s MA Communication Design course for two years.


Erik van Blokland, lecturer

Erik van Blokland, a type designer from The Hague, Netherlands, started the LettError foundry with Just van Rossum in 1989. He studied graphic design at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague, and picked up the taste for type design in Gerrit Noordzij's class. The early experiments in type and code (Beowolf, Trixie, Hands) were published by FontFont. More recently Eames Century Modern at House Industries and lots of work for Photo-Lettering. Tool development became an important part of Erik's work (see Superpolator). First with Petr van Blokland and Just van Rossum in RoboFog. Later with Tal Leming in the RoboFab and UFO projects and the initial stages of the WOFF specification for webfonts. Van Blokland is a senior lecturer at the TypeMedia course of the Royal Academy of Arts.


Matteo Bologna, lecturer

Matteo Bologna is the founding partner and principal of Mucca Design, where he also serves as Creative Director.
Under his direction, the Mucca Design team has solved numerous design challenges and created uniquely successful work for a wide variety of global companies like Sephora, Whole Foods, Victoria’s Secret, Barnes & Noble, Adobe Systems, Bacardi and Target. With his team he designed the identities for a variety of now classic New York City culinary destinations like Balthazar’s and Brooklyn Fare.
The work produced by the Mucca Design team has also been widely recognized by industry publications, competitions and exhibitions, including AIGA, Communication Arts, Eye, Graphis, HOW, PRINT, the Type Directors Club, the Art Directors Club.
He is also the principal of the new Mucca Spin-off type foundry muccaTypo.
Matteo is the President of the Type Directors Club and former board member of AIGA/NY. He frequently lectures about branding and typography around the world.


T. Corey Brennan, lecturer

T. Corey Brennan is associate professor of Classics at Rutgers University-New Brunswick; he also taught at Bryn Mawr College. Brennan was appointed Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the American Academy in Rome, 2009-2012. His books are The Praetorship in the Roman Republic (2 vols., Oxford 2000) and (with Harriet I. Flower) co-editor of East and West: Papers in Ancient History Presented to Glen W. Bowersock (Harvard 2009), and has written many contributions on Roman history and culture.


Tim Brown, lecturer

Tim Brown is a designer, writer, speaker, and toolmaker, with a focus on typography. Formerly a web designer at Vassar College, he is now Type Manager for Adobe Typekit ("The best way to use fonts"), a curator for A List Apart ("For people who make websites"), and the author of Nice Web Type ("For the betterment of typographic style and practice") (@nicewebtype on Twitter).

After making Modular Scale ("Meaningful typographic measurement") and Web Font Specimen ("Real web type in real web context"), Tim wrote about each in two all-time staff favorite A List Apart articles ("More Meaningful Typography and Real Web Type in Real Web Context"). His ideas about Molten Leading inspired jQuery plugins for fluid line-height. He has spoken at Inspire and Build, participated in AIGA Breakthroughs, and appeared on The Big Web Show ("Everything web that matters") with Jeffrey Zeldman.

Tim lives and works in New York State’s beautiful Hudson Valley with his wife and college sweetheart, Eileen, their two daughters, and two dogs.


Matthew Carter, lecturer

Matthew Carter is a type designer with fifty years’ experience of typographic technologies ranging from hand-cut punches to computer fonts. After a long association with the Linotype companies he was a co-founder in 1981 of Bitstream Inc., the digital typefoundry, where he worked for ten years. He is now a principal of Carter & Cone Type Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts, designers and producers of original typefaces. His type designs include ITC Galliard, Snell Roundhand, Shelley Script, Helvetica Compressed, Olympian (for newspaper text), Bell Centennial (for the US telephone directories), ITC Charter, and faces for Greek, Hebrew, Cyrillic and Devanagari. For Carter & Cone he has designed Mantinia, Sophia, Elephant, Big Caslon, Alisal and Miller. Starting in the mid-’90s Carter has worked with Microsoft on a series of “screen fonts” designed to maximize the legibility of type on computer monitors. Of these, Verdana, Tahoma and Nina (a condensed face for hand-held devices) are sanserif types; Georgia is a seriffed design.


Karen Charatan, coordinator, instructor

Karen Charatan creates pen, brush, and drawn lettering as well as calligraphic paintings. The range of work in her 30-year career includes advertising lettering, greeting cards, point-of-purchase displays, murals and sign design. Karen has taught brush lettering, business card design and sign writing for the annual international lettering arts conferences and for many of the calligraphy guilds in the USA, Canada, Europe and Japan. She exhibits her abstract calligraphic paintings with a group of Asian and Western fine artists. Her works are included in the collection of the Mobile Museum of Art in Mobile, AL.


Ewan Clayton, instructor

Ewan is a calligrapher and part-time Professor in Design at The University of Sunderland where he co directs the International Calligraphy Research Centre. He grew up associated with a community of craftsmen at Ditchling in Sussex founded by Eric Gill. Ewan has enjoyed a varied professional career working as both a calligraphy teacher and a consultant to Xerox PARC, and he is currently a core faculty member at the Royal Drawing School in London. In 2013 he was awarded the first Karl-Georg Hoefer prize by The Schreibwerkstatt Klingspor for his work in calligraphy and education. His book on the history of calligraphy and typography The Golden Thread is out in paperback this year in the USA and has recently been released in Spanish and Italian translations.


G. Scott Clemons, lecturer

G. Scott Clemons has collected the Aldine Press since his days as an undergraduate in the Classics Department at Princeton University. He currently serves as the President of the Grolier Club, Treasurer of the Bibliographical Society of America, and is a past Chairman of the Friends of the Princeton University Library. Outside of his bibliophilic interests, Scott is the Chief Investment Strategist of Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., a privately-owned investment firm in New York City. Scott curated the exhibition Aldus Manutius: A Legacy More Lasting Than Bronze, on display at the Grolier Club this past spring, and is the co-author of a companion volume to the exhibition, soon to be available from Oak Knoll Books.


Doug Clouse, lecturer

Doug Clouse is a graphic designer and teacher who lives in New York City. He wrote MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan: Typographic Tastemakers of the Late Nineteenth Century, and co-wrote The Handy Book of Artistic Printing with Angela Voulangas.


Andy Clymer, instructor

Andy Clymer is a typeface designer and developer at H&Co. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in graphic design from San Diego State University and a Master of Design degree in type design from the Type & Media postgraduate course at the Koninklijke Academie van Beeldende Kunsten (Royal Academy of Art) in The Hague, Netherlands. While in The Hague, Andy was influenced heavily by the notion that type designers have had for centuries of building one’s own tools for the job — mechanical bits and pieces, historically, and now bits and pieces of software. This carries through into his role at H&Co where he contributes both to the design of retail and custom typefaces and to the software that helps produce them.


Stephen Cronin, instructor

Stephen Cronin is a front-end web developer working at The Outline living in Queens. After moving to NYC seven years ago he has spent his time working at web agencies, start ups, and editorial websites including Code and TheoryHYPERHYPER, and The Intercept. He has worked with many renowned designers in the web industry executing high-fidelity designs. During his free time he enjoys creating hand lettering artwork and practicing calligraphy. He has received calligraphy training through public workshops at Type@Cooper and Society of Scribes.


Andy Cruz, lecturer

Andy spent his early years learning the dark arts of hot rodding from his father and skating the mean streets of Elsmere, Delaware. After graduating from Delcastle Vocational and Technical High School with “shop” certification in Commercial Art, he opted to skip art school and get right to work. As the art director and creative nerve center of House Industries, Andy uses his calm, quiet demeanor to cajole frustrated House artists, designers and collaborators into forgeting the rules for a just moment to figure out the best way to create something worthwhile. His work is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institution’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, and the Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation. Andy recently completed the book House Industries: The Process is the Inspiration with co-authors/long time conspirators Rich Roat and Ken Barber. If he’s not collecting furniture, Japanese folk art or other junk that will somehow turn into a House Industries design project, he’s spending time with his ladies: wife Stephanie and daughters, Ava and Mia.


Greg D'Onofrio, lecturer

Greg D’Onofrio is designer, teacher and co-founder with partner Patricia Belen at Kind Company, a design office in New York City. He teaches Graphic Design History at the School of Visual Arts and the Fashion Institute of Technology. Emphasizing the work of lesser-known designers or the lesser-known work of well-known designers, Greg has authored essays for subjects including: Pirelli Publicity 1955–67, The American Revolution Bicentennial Symbol, Elaine Lustig Cohen, The U.S. Department of Labor’s Graphic Standards Manual and Lester Beall’s Connecticut General Identity Program. In 2009, he co-founded http://www.thisisdisplay.org, a platform for 2oth century modern graphic design history research. Using Display’s collection, he has co-curated exhibitions for Pratt Institute and Fordham University, most recently: Ladislav Sutnar: Pioneer of Information Design 1941–60. For Greg, understanding graphic design history is a combination of collecting and research. It’s not enough to own the object – it’s also about what the object can teach us.


Mike Daines, lecturer

Mike Daines studied typographic design at the London School of Printing in the 1960s and began his career as a type designer in the London studios of Letraset, where he designed a number of typefaces, notably Hawthorn and University Roman. He worked in display photosetting at Alphabet and TypeShop, then, as a director of Letraset’s Typographic Systems Division, he managed URW, Hamburg, involved in the installation of the Ikarus type digitization systems for Monotype, Compugraphic, Berthold and Linotype. Mike later founded Baseline magazine, Applied Graphics Limited, co-founded Applied Arabic, an Arabic type design licensing company, and The Foundry (with David Quay and Freda Sack), an early digital typefoundry. In 2003 he established eLexicons Limited, to develop interactive learning resources, where he edited and published the eLexicon of Typography.


Kelly Doe, lecturer

Kelly Doe is the Design Director for Brand Identity at The New York Times, where she is currently focusing on video, new digital products and the creation of company-wide brand guidelines. Her work involves close collaboration with creative groups from across the company including editorial, product, corporate, extended brand and marketing. Some of her past projects include developing prototypes for the first Times Reader, the redesign of the International Herald Tribune and leading the 2014 rebrand of Times Video.  

Kelly's national and international clients have included the museums of the Smithsonian Institution, the National Archives, news organizations and magazines in Asia, Europe and Latin America, and a wide range of publishers, artists and non-profits. She recently completed a 75th Year anniversary book for the National Gallery of Art and is consulting with the Freer and Sackler Museums of the Smithsonian on video installations. Happily, one of her current projects is a book and film on the visual history of The New York Times. Kelly’s design, art direction and creative collaborations have been recognized by awards in the worlds of advertising, editorial and fine art.  


Tiziana D’Angelo, lecturer

Tiziana D’Angelo received her Ph.D. in Classical Archaeology from Harvard University in 2013. She is currently a Jane and Morgan Whitney Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She holds a B.A. in Classics from the Università degli Studi di Pavia, Italy, and an M.Phil. in Classical Archaeology from the University of Oxford. Her research and curatorial interests include Greek, Roman, and Etruscan art and archaeology. D’Angelo has participated in archaeological excavations in Italy and Turkey, and held research fellowships in Cambridge (St. John's College), Oxford (St. Hugh's College), Rome (Phi Beta Kappa Society), Los Angeles (Getty Research Institute), and Berlin (Deutsches Archäologisches Institut).


Stéphane Elbaz, instructor

Originally from Paris, France, Stéphane Elbaz is a graphic and type designer currently living and working in New York City. He recently joined First Look Media where he serves as Head of Product Design, Magazines. In the last few years he devoted much of his time to digital publishing platforms. In addition, he continued his type and brand design practice.
For Code and Theory he led visual design on various projects including Vanity Fair and GQ for Condé Nast France, the LA Times, Interview, and Art in America. As an independent designer, Stephane recently created a brand typeface for Sephora and participated in brand projects for companies in sectors ranging from culture and fashion to the energy industry. In 2009 he was awarded the Certificate of Excellence in Type Design from the Type Directors Club of New York for his type family Geneo.


Hannes F. Famira, instructor

Hannes Famira is founding principal of Famirafonts (formerly Kombinat-Typefounders). He is a graphic designer, a type designer and a teacher of both disciplines. After 30 years in the Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland he now lives New York City.

He studied graphic and typographic design at the KABK (Royal Academy of Fine Arts in The Hague) in the Netherlands. After apprenticeships at Studio Dumbar and the Font Bureau he worked at Meta Design, at the Buro Petr van Blokland and at House Industries.

Hannes started his own design studio Das Kombinat in 1999 and the Kombinat-Typefounders in 2001.

He taught various typography and type design classes at the SfG, School for Design in Basel (CH), at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art School of Art, SVA the School of Visual Arts, the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, the New Jersey City University, the Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst Hildesheim/Holzminden/Göttingen, the Kunsthochschule Kassel and the City University of New York. Hannes has been teaching in the Type@Cooper Extended and Condensed programs at the The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art since January 2011.


Dikko Faust, lecturer

Dikko Faust founded Purgatory Pie Press, one of the longest running artist/presses. Purgatory Pie Press limited editions are in public and private collections worldwide including MoMA, the Metropolitan Museum, the Cooper Hewitt, and London's V&A and Tate Modern. Dikko had taught letterpress and run the letterpress shop at Cooper and now teaches at School of Visual Arts where he was instrumental in setting up their type shop.


Tom Foley, instructor

Tom Foley is a graphic designer, typographer and type designer currently living and working in London. Tom earned his BA in Visual Communications from Limerick School of Art and Design in 2007 and MA from Central Saint Martins in 2009. Prior to joining Dalton Maag he worked with Polimekanos, Micha Weidmann Studio, Atelier Dreibholz and Atelier David Smith. Tom also occasionally teaches design and has carried out lectures and workshops at Universities including Central Saint Martins, University of West England, Limerick School of Art & Design, Dun Laoghaire Institute, University of Santa Clara, Ravensbourne and SVA New York. From 2011 - 2015 Tom worked as a full time Font developer at Dalton Maag where he has been involved in custom and library Type design projects covering Latin, Greek, Cyrillic, Tamil and Bengali script systems. Tom currently works as Senior Typographic Advisor at Dalton Maag.


William Germano, lecturer

William Germano received his B.A. from Columbia and his Ph.D. in English from Indiana University. He was appointed dean and has taught at Cooper Union since 2006. He teaches the freshman core, as well as courses on Shakespeare, opera, the history of the book and an elective on puppets and robots.


In 2015 Professor Germano gave "How Shakespeare Works," a free ten-lecture night course in Cooper Union's Great Hall.


His scholarly work considers literature and the allied arts, the material culture of the book, and the problems of intellectual production. He is particularly interested in the writing life of scholars, a subject he has written on in Getting It Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books (University of Chicago Press, 3rd ed. 2016), which has been translated into Japanese, and From Dissertation to Book(University of Chicago Press, 2nd ed. 2013), which has been published in Spanish.


He has also written on Powell and Pressburger's 1951 film "The Tales of Hoffmann" (2013) in the British Film Institute Film Classics series. His essays have appeared in PMLA, minnesota review, Scholarly Publishing, SPAN, Publishing Research Quarterly, PNR and other publications. His scholarly essays have appeared in Opera Quarterly, University of Toronto Quarterly, The Critical Pulse: Thirty-Two Conversations with Contemporary Critics (Columbia UP, 2012), and The Humanities and Public Life (Fordham UP, 2014). He is a contributor to the two-volume Cambridge Guide to the Worlds of Shakespeare (2016) and the Oxford Companion to Shakespearean Tragedy (2016).


For over twenty years he directed programs in scholarly publishing, first as editor-in-chief at Columbia University Press and then as vice-president and publishing director at Routledge; during his publishing career he developed wide experience with disciplines in both the humanities and social sciences, working with many extraordinary scholars, among them Peter Galison, Jacques Derrida, Cornel West, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Gilles Deleuze, bell hooks, Herbert Gans, Stephen Orgel, Michael Taussig, Dario Fo, Sander Gilman, Stephen Greenblatt, Arthur Danto, Raymond Williams, Paul Willis, Stanley Aronowitz, David Bordwell, Julia Kristeva, Wayne Koestenbaum, James Elkins, Marjorie Garber, Peter Stallybrass, Fredric Jameson, Diana Fuss, and Martin Jay.


He has taught in the graduate program in publishing at NYU, is a frequent speaker at academic conferences, and has given workshops and seminars on professional scholarly writing across North America and in Europe, the Middle East, and New Zealand.


A trustee emeritus of The English Institute, he serves on the advisory council of the Princeton University department of Englishthe boards of Johns Hopkins University Press and of Goldsmiths Press (UK), and the board of the Chicago Manual of Style.


Dean Germano is a regular contributor to the language blog Lingua Franca published by the Chronicle of Higher Education.


His next project is called Eye Chart – a cultural history of the eye chart and its many uses in medicine and beyond. It will be published in Fall 2017 by Bloomsbury.


He is working on a book on revising academic writing, to be published by the University of Chicago Press, and a project tentatively called Shakespeare at the Opera: A History of Impossible Projects, which will consider the ways in which Shakespeare's very English plays and characters have been adapted into a very Continental dramatic form. 



Allan Haley, lecturer

Allan Haley is Director of Words & Letters at Monotype Imaging. Here he is involved in all aspects of building and maintaining the company’s typeface library. Mr. Haley is also responsible for educational content for the company’s web sites and is an important link between Monotype Imaging and the graphic design and design education communities.

Prior working for Monotype Imaging, Mr. Haley was principal of Resolution, a consulting firm with expertise in fonts, font technology, type and typographic communication. He was also executive vice president of International Typeface Corporation.

Mr. Haley is ex officio Chairman of the Board of the Society of Typographic Aficionados, and past President of the New York Type Directors Club. He is highly regarded as an educator and is a frequently requested speaker at national computer and design conferences. Mr. Haley is also a prolific writer, with six books on type and graphic communication and hundreds of articles for graphic design publications to his credit.


Berton Hasebe, instructor

Berton Hasebe is a type designer living in New York. From 2008–2013 he worked at Commercial Type, helping to develop typefaces for retail release, and custom typefaces for clients including Bloomberg Businessweek, The New York Times, Nike, and Wallpaper*. Through Commercial Type he's released the typefaces Druk, Portrait and Platform. Since 2013 he's worked independently and teaches typography at Parsons The New School for Design and type design at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

Berton received his bachelors degree in graphic design from Otis College of Art and Design in 2005, and moved to the Netherlands in 2007 to study type design at the Type and Media masters program at The Royal Academy of Art in the Hague (KABK). His typeface Alda, designed while attending Type and Media, was awarded the 2008 judges pick from the Type Directors Club in New York and was released by Emigre in 2011.

Berton's work has been recognized by the ATypI, BRNO Biennale, TDC, and Tokyo TDC. In 2012 he was featured as one of Print Magazine’s New Visual Artists.


Norman Hathaway, lecturer

Norman Hathaway is an art director and design historian. He is the author of Overspray and co-author with Dan Nadel of Electrical Banana: Masters of Psychedelic Art and Dorothy and Otis: Designing the American Dream. He has led creative initiatives for institutions including The Design Museum, London and the Royal Academy of Arts, as well as artists including Paul McCartney. He has taught widely on the history of design and typography for the London College of Printing, The Royal College of Art, and Goldsmiths College.


Cyrus Highsmith, lecturer

Cyrus Highsmith joined the Font Bureau in 1997. As Senior Designer, he concentrates on development of new typefaces. A faculty member at Rhode Island School of Design department of graphic design since 2000, he teaches letter drawing. He also leads workshops and is a frequent lecturer across the United States, Mexico, and Europe.

Highsmith is known for his original approach to drawing letterforms. His designs have been specified for diverse platforms including Rolling Stone, starwars.com, and the Ford Motor Company. He has also created custom typefaces for clients including The Wall Street Journal, Martha Stewart Living, La Prensa Gráfica, ESPN, Men’s Health, and El Universal.

In addition to being a type designer, Highsmith is an illustrator and author. In 2012, Font Bureau published his first book, Inside Paragraphs: Typographic Fundamentals, about which Matthew Carter wrote “There is nothing you need to understand about using type that’s not in this book.”


Jessica Hische, lecturer

Jessica Hische is a letterer, illustrator, graphic designer, and typeface designer living in Brooklyn, NY. You may know Jessica through her various projects, like Don’t Fear the Internet, Daily Drop Cap, Should I Work for Free?, or Mom, this is how twitter works.

Jessica previously worked at Louise Fili Ltd where she was Senior Designer. She has worked for clients such as Tiffany & Co., Victoria’s Secret, American Express, Target, New York Times, Boston Globe, Chronicle Books, Random House, and Penguin Books to name a few. Her work has been featured in most major design and illustration publications including Communication Arts, Print magazine, STEP magazine, HOW magazine, Graphis, American Illustration, and the Society of Illustrators annual. She was featured in 2009 as one of STEP magazine’s 25 emerging artists and as one of Print magazine’s New Visual Artists 2009.

She very much enjoys good food, black coffee, and her two cats, Olive and Billy.


Jonathan Hoefler, lecturer

Jonathan Hoefler has been designing typefaces since 1989. His company, Hoefler & Co., is home to one of the world’s most distinguished font libraries, designs such as Knockout, Gotham, Mercury and Archer that are known for both high performance and high style.

Hoefler has been awarded both the Prix Charles Peignot for outstanding contributions to type design, and the AIGA Medal, the design profession’s highest honor. A two-time honoree of the National Design Award, H&Co’s work is in the permanent collections of both the Smithsonian Institution and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.


Elinor A. Holland, instructor

Elinor A. Holland, a student of both Arabic and English calligraphy for over twenty years, has taught calligraphy to students of all ages at schools, museums, and other learning institutions since 1994, including the New York Public Library, The Smithsonian Institute, the Center for Book Arts, and the Metropolitan Museum. Her freelance work includes private and commercial commissions.


Eric Holzenberg, lecturer

Eric Holzenberg is Director of the Grolier Club of New York, America's oldest and largest society for enthusiasts in the book and graphic arts. Since 1994 he has shaped the Grolier Club's mission to celebrate the enduring value of the book-as-object, promoting the Club's 100,000-volume research library on books and printing, its 128-year-old series of public exhibitions on bookish themes, and its venerable roster of finely printed books-on-books. A former chair of the Rare Books & Manuscripts Section of ALA/ACRL, and past president of the American Printing History Association, Mr. Holzenberg holds an MA in library science from the University of Chicago, where he specialized in rare books and manuscripts; and an MA in history from Loyola University of Chicago. Among other books for the Grolier Club, he is the author of The Middle Hill Press (1997), and co-author of For Jean Grolier & His Friends: 125 Years of Grolier Club Exhibitions & Publications, 1884-2009. He has in addition written numerous articles, and lectured widely, on various topics in bibliography, bibliophily, and book history. His course on "The Printed Book in the West Since 1800" has been taught annually at the University of Virginia's Rare Book School program since 1998, and he is also an adjunct faculty member of the Rare Books Program of the Palmer Library School of LIU. Mr. Holzenberg is an avid collector of (among many other things) books on architecture and design, particularly the English Gothic Revival, and the Aesthetic Movement in Europe and America.


Mark Jamra, lecturer

Mark Jamra is a type designer and Associate Professor at Maine College of Art in Portland, ME. He has designed and produced typefaces for over 30 years and is the founder of TypeCulture, a digital type foundry and academic resource. His typeface designs include: Alphatier, Phoreus Cherokee, Expo Sans, Expo Serif, Latienne, ITC Jamille, Tacitus and Kinesis, an Adobe Original. His lettering and typefaces have been exhibited in numerous exhibitions and received awards from the Type Directors Club and the Association Typographique Internationale (ATypI). He is also a co-founder of JamraPatel, a studio for collaborative type design projects.

Mark graduated with a BFA degree from Kent State University and completed his graduate studies in 1983 at the School of Design in Basel, Switzerland. He has lectured. conducted workshops and taught graphic design, letterform design and type history at colleges in the U.S and Germany. He has been a typographic consultant to the Hewlett-Packard Research Laboratories in Bristol, England and for URW Software & Type GmbH in Hamburg, Germany. He is currently serving on the ATypI's board of directors.


Chester Jenkins, lecturer

Chester Jenkins is an American type designer of British parentage. After graduating from Collège Dawson in Montréal in 1992, he spent two years in the London and Utrecht offices of Newell & Sorrell. In 1995 Chester moved to Chicago to work with Rick Valicenti at Thirst and eventually become a partner in the Thirstype foundry. In 2004 Chester decamped to New York City and formed Village, a loose co-op of a dozen foundries from around the world, with his wife and partner Tracy Jenkins. Besides his published work, Chester has created bespoke typefaces for Maharam, Avinor, New York City Opera, the NFL, and many others, and has collaborated with Pentagram Design, 2x4, and Snøhetta, to name a few.


Scott Kellum, lecturer

Scott Kellum is a designer and front-end web developer living and working in NYC. He currently works at Roger Black Studio on Treesaver. Scott previously worked with Darden Studio designing type after graduating from Parsons the New School for Design.


Ben Kiel, instructor

Ben Kiel is a typeface designer, an educator, and a partner in XYZ Type. Ben worked for several years at House Industries, with a specialty in solving complex problems at the overlap of design and technology. He received his MA in Typeface Design from the University of Reading. He currently teaches at Washington University in Saint Louis and Type@Cooper.


Indra Kupferschmid, lecturer

Indra Kupferschmid is a German typographer and professor at HBKsaar, University of Arts Saarbrücken. Fueled by specimen books, she is occupied with type around the clock and in all its incarnations: webfonts, bitmap fonts, other fonts, type history, DIN committees, research, writing, designing, and any combination of this. She is co-author of Helvetica forever by Lars Müller Publishers and wrote Buchstaben kommen selten allein, a typography text book (German; Niggli). She consults for the type industry, contributes to print- and web projects such as Codex, Slanted, Typographica and Fonts In Use, next to juggling her own small- and ultralarge-scale ventures.


Troy Leinster, instructor

Troy Leinster is an Australian typeface designer at Hoefler & Co in New York City. He holds a Masters Degree in Typeface Design from Type & Media program at The Royal Academy of Art (KABK) in The Hague, and is a graduate of the first Type@Cooper Condensed Program in New York. At H&Co he has collaborated on retail typefaces such as the Ringside superfamily, Peristyle and Operator Mono. 



Jean-Baptiste Levée, lecturer

Jean-Baptiste Levée works methodically in a process where history and technology are approached altogether within the nuances of artistry. He manufactures functional, yet versatile digital platforms for designers to build upon.
Levée has designed over a hundred typefaces for industry, moving pictures, fashion and publishing. His work has won multiple awards and has been shown internationally in group and solo shows. It is featured in the permanent collections of the French national library (BnF) and the National Center of arts (Cnap); of the Newberry Library in Chicago, and several printing museums in Europe. He is a board member and the country delegate for France at ATypI (Association Typographique Internationale). Levée curates exhibitions on typeface design, organizes research symposiums and teaches typeface design at the Amiens school of Arts & Design and at the University of Corte. He is a typography columnist and editor on Pointypo.com.


Ruth Lingen, lecturer

Ruth Lingen studied typography and bookmaking with Walter Hamady, and was also his shop assistant for 3 years. Under his influence, she discovered the pleasure of collaborating with writers and artists. Since then, she has collaborated with over 60 artists in book and print form, and her books are held in over 40 public libraries. A member of the Booklyn Artist Alliance, Ruth has twice received the "50 Best Books/Covers Award" from the American Institute of Graphic Arts.


Richard Lipton, lecturer

Richard Lipton has been making exquisite letterforms for over 40 years. He was introduced to the magic of calligraphy while studying art and design at Harpur College in upstate New York. He continued his lettering journey in 1975 as a freelance calligrapher, sign painter and graphic designer and established a calligraphy studio in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 1983, Lipton began working for Bitstream, an innovative digital type foundry under the guidance of Mike Parker and Matthew Carter, eventually helping to make Bitstream’s type library one of the most respected in the industry. In his tenure as senior designer, Lipton developed two original type families: Arrus, and Cataneo (with Jacqueline Sakwa). In 1991, Lipton created an independent type and calligraphy studio and designed many original typefaces including Bickham Script Pro for Adobe and Sloop for Font Bureau. He is currently a senior designer at Font Bureau where he develops original typefaces and custom fonts for international clients. He is currently on the faculty at RISD where he teaches type design and calligraphy.


Bruno Maag, instructor

Bruno Maag is a trained typesetter from Zurich, Switzerland. After graduating from Basel School of Design with degrees in Typography and Visual Communications he emigrated to England where he worked for Monotype creating custom typefaces. After a year in Chicago with Monotype he returned to England to start Dalton Maag, focussing on the creation of custom typefaces. 

Bruno today is the Chairman of Dalton Maag and in recent years has spearheaded projects for large global companies and small enterprises alike. Some of the clients include Nokia, Intel, HP, Amazon, Lush, Faena, The Stroke Foundation and Rio2016 to name a few. His interests today extend into scientific research into reading physiology and psychology.


Sébastien Morlighem, lecturer

Sébastien Morlighem studied at the École Supérieure Estienne (Paris), where he learned type design. He works since 1995 as a graphic designer for books and records. He teaches the history of graphic design and typography and is co-director of the post-graduate program ‘Typography and Language’ at the École Supérieure d’Art et de Design in Amiens. He created and curates the Bibliothèque typographique collection for Ypsilon Éditeur and co-authored books about French type designers José Mendoza y Almeida and Roger Excoffon. He is currently preparing a PhD for the Department of Typography and Graphic Communication at the University of Reading (United Kingdom).


Daniel Morris, instructor

For the last twelve years, Daniel Morris has run The Arm, a public access letterpress studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. He comes from a family of letterpress printers going back four generations. He has been involved with letterpress at Cooper Union since 2007. www.thearmnyc.com


Tim Murtaugh, instructor

Tim has been working on the web since 1997, and specializes in developing custom publishing systems with responsive HTML5 interfaces. His eye for design and affinity for clean code allow him to painlessly integrate his templates into larger systems without sacrificing user experience or aesthetics.

Tim started in the non-profit world, moved on to start-ups, shifted to an agency, upgraded to publishing, and is currently the co-founder of the small NYC shop Monkey Do. Tim can be found on Twitter at @murtaugh.


Raymond 'Stan' Nelson, lecturer

Raymond 'Stan' Nelson is a practicing punchcutter, typefounder, and letterpress printer who had the great good fortune to work in the Graphic Arts Collection at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History from 1972 to 2003, and continues to serve there as a Museum Specialist Emeritus. Stan's extensive knowledge of printing and typefounding history, as well as over forty years of practical experience with the oldest technologies for making printing types, gives him a unique perspective when examining the tools and methods connected with the production of metal letter. Stan can be seen making type in videos available on YouTube, as well as in the BBC production The Machine that Made Us, hosted by Stephen Fry.


Denis Pelli, lecturer

I studied applied math at Harvard (BA '75) and vision at Cambridge (Physiology PhD '81), with Campbell and Robson. At Minneapolis ('80 postdoc with Legge), Syracuse ('81-'95 professor), and NASA Ames ('87 sabbatical with Watson and Ahumada), I worked on visual requirements of reading and mobility, on visual testing (e.g. the Pelli-Robson Contrast Sensitivity Chart), and on characterizing the limits of visual perception. Since 1995 I've been Professor of Psychology and Neural Science at New York University, studying letter and object recognition and beauty.


Jill Pichotta, lecturer

Jill Pichotta has worked for the Font Bureau for 25 years and began as an apprentice with David Berlow in 1991. Her work has included projects for Rolling Stone, Esquire, Condé Nast Traveller, The New York Times, and Apple Computer. As a senior designer she has managed the production of the company's retail library since May 1993, and has made several contributions herself. She is the principal editor and has assisted type designers with all details from submission to release. She continues to divide her time between various Retail, Custom and OEM projects. Ms. Pichotta works from her studio and enjoys living in a small New England seaside town north of Boston.


Jean François Porchez, instructor

Jean François Porchez is founder of Typofonderie, type director of ZeCraft, Jean François Porchez’s expertise covers both the design of bespoke typefaces, logotypes and typographic consultancy. He is honorary President of the Association Typographique Internationale (was ATypI President in 2004–2007) and frequent speaker at conferences all over the world. Introduced to French Who’s Who in 2009.

After training as a graphic designer, during which he focused on type design, Jean François Porchez (1964) worked as a type director at Dragon Rouge, then at Le Monde newspaper. Since 2012, he teaches at Type@Cooper, (United States) and he is the programme director for typographic & type design at ECV (France). He taught type design at the MA typeface design at the Reading University (United Kingdom), at Ensad, (France) and conduct regularly type design workshops all over the world. He also contributes regularly to international publications. He was awarded the Prix Charles Peignot in 1998 and numerous prizes for his typefaces.


Jesse Ragan, instructor, lecturer

Jesse Ragan runs the small type foundry XYZ Type with business partner Ben Kiel, and designs custom typefaces and lettering independently in Brooklyn, New York. He has served on the board of directors for AIGA/NY and has taught at Type@Cooper (which he co-founded) and Pratt Institute. After graduating from Rhode Island School of Design, Jesse started his career at Hoefler & Frere-Jones. Notable past design collaborations include Gotham, Archer, and Omnes.


François Rappo, lecturer

Rappo Francois lives and works in Lausanne, Switzerland. Born in 1955, trained as a graphic designer, specialized in the field of type design and has published fonts as Didot Elder, Theinhardt Grotesk, Genath, Orso, Plain Grotesque (Optimo font foundry). His type design portfolio includes projects for: Vogue Hommes International, The New York Times Magazine, ICA Institute of Contemporary Art London. From 2001 to 2008 François Rappo was head of jury of ‘The Most beautiful Swiss Books’ competition. He is currently head of master program Art Direction/Type Design at ECAL University Of Art And Design Lausanne.


Thomas Rinaldi, lecturer

Thomas Rinaldi grew up in the Hudson River Valley near Poughkeepsie, New York. He is the co-author of the book Hudson Valley Ruins:  Forgotten Landmarks of an American Landscape, published by the University Press of New England in 2006, and the author of New York Neon, published by W.W. Norton in 2012.  His photographs have been published in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Post, the New York ObserverWestchester Magazine, CNN Online, and elsewhere, and have been exhibited at the Municipal Art Society of New York and will be shown in a forthcoming exhibition at the New York State Museum in Albany.  He holds degrees from Georgetown University and Columbia University, and has worked for the National Park Service, the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation, and the Central Park Conservancy.  Rinaldi currently works as an architectural designer  in New York City. 


Rich Roat, lecturer

After picking up a degree in communication from the University of Delaware, Rich held jobs as a communications associate for United Way of Delaware and manager of a service bureau/prepress house. He met Andy Cruz in 1991 and allowed his new friend to talk him into a series of ill-advised but fortunate career moves that led to the formation of Brand Design Co., Inc., and, subsequently House Industries. Rich initially tried to tame the chaos of Andy’s constantly shifting aesthetic sensibilities and obsessive attention to detail; thankfully, he has been largely unsuccessful. He learned to embrace the anarchy and try skim a few bucks off the top of whatever House Industries got into to keep the business on an even keel. In the time that’s left over, he writes arcane product copy, deciphers force-majeure-in-any-and-all-media-now-and-to-be-invented clauses, and attempts to keep his itchy middle finger in check. Rich is a co-author of House Industries: The Process is the Inspiration (Watson Guptill/Penguin Random House, 2017) with Andy Cruz and Ken Barber.


David Jonathan Ross, lecturer

David Jonathan Ross draws letters of all shapes and sizes for custom and retail typeface designs. A native of Los Angeles, He began drawing typefaces at Hampshire College and joined The Font Bureau in 2007 where he honed his bézier-wrangling skills. Now he publishes his designs at his own foundry, DJR, as well as working on projects with Type Network and developing display faces for his Font of the Month Club. You’ll find him in Western Massachusetts with his partner Emily and their two dogs, Sophie and Lily.


Aleksandra Samuļenkova, instructor

Aleksandra Samuļenkova is a Latvian-born type designer. She studied visual communication in Riga (Latvia) and Berlin (Germany), where she studied type design with Luc(as) de Groot. In 2012, she graduated from the Type and Media master program at the Royal Academy of Art the Hague (The Netherlands). Aleksandra’s graduation project Pilot won the first prize at The Fine Press Association’s Student Type Competition, and received a “Certificate of Typographic Excellence” in the 2017 TDC Typeface Design Competition. From 2012 until early 2017 Aleksandra worked as a type designer at LucasFonts in Berlin. In the beginning of 2017 she moved to the Netherlands. Aleksandra’s daily work as a type designer in various countries resulted in a keen interest in the origins of typographic traditions within the Latin and Cyrillic scripts.


Stephen O. Saxe, lecturer

Stephen O. Saxe edited the Newsletter of the American Printing History Association for five years, writing an essay for each issue on a wide range of printing subjects. He is the author of American Iron Hand Presses (1992). He edited a revised edition of Annenberg’s Type Foundries of America and their Catalogs (1994), the standard bibliography of American type specimens, and edited Gabriel Rummonds’ two-volume Nineteenth Century Printing Practices and the Iron Handpress (2004). He is co-editor of Loy’s Nineteenth-Century American Designers and Engravers of Type (2009), for which he scanned 800 typefaces from his collection of American foundry type specimen books. A graduate of Harvard and Yale, he was a stage and television scenic designer before he became interested in printing history.


Christian Schwartz, lecturer

Christian Schwartz is a partner, with London-based designer Paul Barnes, in the type foundry Commercial Type. Schwartz has published fonts with many respected independent foundries and designed proprietary typefaces for corporations and publications worldwide.

Schwartz and Barnes began an ongoing collaboration in 2005 with their extensive typeface system for The Guardian, which led to honors from the Design Museum and D&AD. The two have completed custom typefaces for clients including Esquire, the Empire State Building, Bosch, The New York Times, and Bloomberg Businessweek. In 2007, Schwartz was awarded the prestigious Prix Charles Peignot, given every four or five years by the Association Typographique Internationale to a designer under 35 who has made “an outstanding contribution to the field of type design”.


Paul Shaw, lecturer

Paul Shaw is a letter designer and graphic design historian. He is the sole proprietor of Paul Shaw / Letter Design, a studio specializing for thirty years in calligraphy, lettering and typography. Among his clients have been Clairol, Origins, Lord & Taylor, Campbell’s Soup, Cinzano, Vignelli Associates, and Pentagram. Paul was formerly a partner in LetterPerfect, a digital type foundry based in Seattle. Since 1980 he has taught calligraphy, lettering, typography and graphic design history at a variety of New York area design schools. Currently he is at both Parsons School of Design and the School of Visual Arts. He writes on letter-related subjects for Print, Eye, Baseline, Letter Arts Review, and AIGA's Voice. His book Helvetica and the New York City Subway sold out in two months, with a trade edition planned to be published by MIT Press. In 2002 Paul was a fellow at the American Academy in Rome. Finally, Paul is the reigning authority on W.A. Dwiggins, having spent 30 years researching his life and work.


Juliet Shen, lecturer

Juliet Shen has taught typography at the School of Visual Concepts in Seattle since 1999, with a year off to get an MA in typeface design at the University of Reading, UK. Her dissertation on the type designs of Morris Fuller Benton has been published by Sherwin Beach Press in a letterpress edition hand composed in Benton’s Cloister Old Style. Juliet’s typeface Bullen, released by Font Bureau, was inspired by her perusal of typefaces in the early ATF specimen books. She has had an independent design firm in Seattle since 1989 and concentrates today on custom font design. Her Lushootseed font for the Tulalip Tribes of Washington is the first newly designed Native American font to be cut as wood type by the Hamilton Museum and is used in efforts to revive the daily use of the critically endangered language. She is a board member of SOTA, the producers of TypeCon, and the director of the Type Americana conference in Seattle. Juliet received her B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and Certificate of Fine Arts from the Cooper Union.