Type@Cooper - Stanley Morison: Master of Modern Typography.

Stanley Morison: Master of Modern Typography.


with Nicolas Barker




Mon., Nov. 07 – Mon., Nov. 07, 2016
6:30PM – 8:30PM
location: Rose Auditorium

Stanley Morison, author of First Principles of Typography, has exercised a greater influence on the shape of printed words in the last century than anyone else. Chance reading of The Times Printing Supplement on printing on 10 September 1912 introduced him to the world of printing. The Monotype process of simultaneously casting and composing type had just been perfected so as to match the quality of hand-cast type, and Morison convinced the Monotype company to embark on a series of new types that outdid its competitors. By now familiar with the history of both writing and printing, he was able through historical writing to demonstrate the quality of the new Garamond, Baskerville, and, through his friendship with Eric Gill, Perpetua and Gill Sans. As Editor of The Fleuron, he displayed by example all the latest work in print and graphic design, as well as its history. His career reached its climax with the commission to re-design The Times, and with it to create Times New Roman, the most popular of all modern types. He went on to write the history of The Times and, despite the destruction of his books and papers in World War II, the history of the ancient Fell types at Oxford. His last work, Politics and Script, revealed the mutual impact of politics and religion on script and print.

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Lecturer: Nicolas Barker

Stanley Morison: Master of Modern Typography.
Nicolas Barker was educated at New College, Oxford and holds an Hon. D. from the University of York. He was a trainee at Sir Isaac Pitman & Son, a publisher’s production manager at Baillière, Tindall & Cox and at Rupert Hart-Davis. He served as Assistant Keeper at the National Portrait Gallery, Production Director at Macmillan & Co, and Oxford University Press. He was Deputy Keeper at the British Library with responsibility for conservation and special materials. He was trustee and Deputy Chairman of The Pilgrim Trust, and Visiting Professor, U.C.L.A.

Mr. Barker served on the Arts Panel and Libraries Adviser for the The National Trust, was Library Adviser at the House of Commons, Chairman and then Vice President of the London Library, Chairman of the Library Committee for the Royal Horticultural Society, Chairman of the laurence Sterne Trust, Member of council for the Leather Conservation Centre, and a Fellow of the British Academy. He was Sandars Reader in Bibliography at Cambridge University, Order of
the British Empire in 2002, Feoffee at Chetham’s Hospital. Also, Mr. Barker was on the Advisory Council at the National Museum of Science and Invention and is an Honorary Fellow at New College.

He is the current Editor of The Book Collector (since 1965); Chairman, The Type Museum (1996), and The York Glaziers’ Trust (2004);; and Chetham’s Library (1996);; Senior Consultant Curator, Rosenbach Museum and Library, Philadelphia (1993); Governor, St Bride Foundation (1976);.

Latterly: Past President (1982-6), the Bibliographical Society, and Amici Thomae Mori (1974-84); member, Publishing Board of Directors, Royal National Institute for the Blind, and Charities Advisory Panel, B.B.C. & I.B.A. Sometime consultant to the University Library, University of California at Los Angeles; Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto; Pierpont Morgan Library, New York.

Among his many published works are (Ed.) S.Morison, Politics and Script, ed. (1972)
Stanley Morison (1972), Aldus Manutius and the Development of Greek Script & Type in the Fifteenth Century (1985; second edition, 1992), (Ed.) Stanley Morison, Early Italian Writing Books: Renaissance to Baroque (1990), ‘The Script of the Towneley Lectionary’, The Towneley Lectionary (ed. J.Alexander, 1997), Form and Meaning in the History of the Book (selected essays, 2003), (with David Quentin), The Library of Thomas Tresham and Thomas Brudenell (2006), and The Glory of the Art of Writing: The Calligraphic Work of Francesco Alunno of Ferrara (2009).




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